US Netflix vs UK Netflix

For the past few years Netflix has become a fundamental part of watching TV and films without the use of a TV. Critics and analysts have fallen over themselves to proclaim how revolutionary streaming services are.

After a month of using Netflix I decided to download a proxy onto my browser to see what content other countries and was annoyed to discover that UK user have been somewhat backhanded by copyright.

This however is not the fault of Netflix. After the resurgence of its business many of Netflix’s rivals were quick to snap up the streaming right for programmes and films available on the US Netflix.

Netflix has tried to rectify this issue by offering more money than its rivals like Amazon Prime however some companies are holding back on jumping into bed with Netflix as it still has ongoing problems like the proxy example used above. Also Netflix users can share their accounts with friends and family meaning they miss out on capitalising on an unpaying audience. While this is good for many users who don’t want to pay for the service (like my older sister *ahem*), Netflix has encouraged users to share their accounts. From the perspective of the companies that Netflix is trying to court, this is a risky move as it means Netflix and said companies could lose out on substancial funds.

 

 

 

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4 Comments

  1. I think that it is very annoying that we do not get to watch the same shows that are available on the american netflix. So many people use both the american and UK netflix and netflix are aware of this. I agree with Julia’s comment and I think that eventually resort to using other online platforms to watch shows, whether these are legal or not.

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  2. I recently downloaded an app called Smartflix to my Mac, which enables your Netflix account to access the worldwide catalogue, not just UK or US (Canada in particular has great movies on there!). Now, all of a sudden Netflix has decided to block 30% of random Smartflix users, justifying it with VPN detection. I’ve found a forum where many users discuss this angrily – Netflix lets accounts be shared and, as you said, doesn’t capitalise on unpaying users, but paying users wishing to expand their catalogue must be combatted? I feel like their restrictive actions will eventually lead to many users returning to piracy or resort to other platforms, so Netflix’s longterm solution might really be to work on their worldwide copyright restrictions to keep the audience happy.

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  3. I do wonder why different programmes are available in the US and the UK as Netflix are obviously aware that putting different shows on different sites is not going to stop anybody watching the shows that are not supposed to be available to them. And as far as copyright goes, the fact that audiences who do not subscribe to the service are not supposed to be able to watch the shows also does not stop them watching. Therefore you wonder why Netflix does not do something about this issue. Perhaps it is because of the changes in digital technology and in particular the TV industry whereby a lot more people are now watching online and therefore often do not pay for their TV (i.e.: watching through on-demand services) and therefore do not see the point in spending money on something when soon after, someone will find another way to break the system.

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  4. I think the different versions of Netflix are both exciting and annoying. Being from the US, I’m used to the programs available on US Netflix so I was excited to see the shows that UK Netflix had! I actually just finished an American show that’s only available here. I also use a proxy because I definitely miss my US shows, so I find myself going back and forth between both UK and US. Netflix obviously knows that people share accounts and most likely knows that people use proxies all the time. I’ve had some issues with Netflix blocking my proxy, but for the most part it’s ok. I don’t know why they wouldn’t want everybody to have the same content available – that would be super cool.

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